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  •  Three years ago, we made the best decision in deciding to adopt another ESS.  Zoey then came to us and is the BEST dog ever.  She is not only beautiful but so well behaved and is loved by everyone. We can't thank MAESSR and Debbie enough for giving us Zoey.                                                                                                                                                                                                  Judy Minnick, NJ              

Customer Testimonials
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Molly 53

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Entered: 05/10/2021
Status: Available
Age: 11
Color: Liver/White
Weight: 46 lbs.
Gender: Altered Female
Location: Fayetteville, WV
Health: UTD, HW-, beginning supplements to support joint and skin health, hooded vulva, lipomas requiring no treatment, blindness due to SARDS, removal of benign masses and dental complete, treatment for UTI and bilateral ear infections complete
Temperament: Good with adults, reportedly good with children but hasn’t met any in foster care, good with other dogs, unknown with cats




Molly 53's Story . . .
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Update 08/13/2021: “She rode out what rockers were built for and then, laid herself down with a grin of accomplishment when all motion finally stopped.“


Miss Mollyken continues to amaze her foster family. She’s clearly enjoyed their gated porch this summer, consistently bypassing comfy dog beds for the cooler, wood floor. She’s always up for an invitation to the couch but never stays long. So, it was quite the surprise one afternoon when she decided the cushy wicker rocker was of interest. It’s fair to say the rocker teetered as she placed her first paw on it. It steadied a bit when she added her second paw. That emboldened her. In one Olympic-class move, she leaped and stuck a landing safely on the seat. She rode out what rockers were built for and then, laid herself down with a grin of accomplishment when all motion finally stopped. Molly didn’t get a gold medal, but she was rewarded with an extra treat for entertainment!

Molly’s been sharing her home with other fosters this summer. When she occasionally bumped into Scout, he really didn’t seem to even notice. She was unruffled and redirected herself, continuing on her way to wherever. It wasn’t quite so easy for Flynn to understand her bumping into him, or to interpret her message when they met nose-to-nose. Her eyes can fix straight ahead at times, as if she’s challenging someone. Flynn was never mean to Molly but did let her know in appropriate dog fashion that he was uncomfortable at times. This didn’t scare Molly but has prompted her to pick paths more thoughtfully when she goes bouncing through the house. The value of this observation is that, as Molly continues to search for her forever home, it seems that home could be one that already has a resident dog or not. Peaceful home life may depend more on another dog than on Molly. And since she has no dependency on canines, she could also be content as an only dog… how typically “Springer.”

With cooler days ahead, Molly will visit the dog park more often. As a good traveler and with trustworthy people skills, she may do some day trips with her family. She’s a nice size, attractive to those who meet her, and brings little by way of special needs. She simply needs a loving family to share a home with. She’s ready… are you?

Update 07/04/2021:  “The sweetest part of living with Molly is her enjoyment of human companionship. She's not clingy but does seek it out."   

Miss Molly celebrated an uncomplicated recovery from surgery recently. Stitches from two mass removals were taken out mid-morning and, by early afternoon, she was exploring a dog park. The visit was a first for her. Checking out the entire perimeter more than once and crisscrossing the fully shaded interior kept her on the move for half an hour. She briefly and calmly crossed paths with another dog and its people as they were leaving the park. Beyond that, she had the entire place to herself, an excellent opportunity for a first visit.  

Post-surgery, Molly got good news from her vet. Removal of the masses that had been bothering her were complete and diagnosed as benign. She had a dental the same day with no extractions, more good news. The vet did note she has a hooded vulva; it’s a permanent aspect of her anatomy. This doesn’t bother Molly but may benefit from a bit of attention from her family. Trimming the surrounding fur and regular, light cleansing is appropriate. Fortunately, she is quite cooperative with the added attention! 

Miss Mo or Mollyken continues to be an easy-to-live-with senior. She’s flawless about going to the correct door when it’s time to potty. She’s vocal only when she hears the supper routine begin. Then, she often barks at her foster mom as if to say “hurry, hurry!”  Her soft snore brings smiles most evenings; she’s clearly relaxed into a deep sleep, with or without a visit to the dog park. She continues to settle in her crate when home alone and through 8-hour nights. She crates for travel and rides quietly. She’s been working on leash manners during recovery and has shown improvement. She needs a steady and patient hand on the other end of her leash but is expected to make gains with more guidance. 

The sweetest part of living with Molly is her enjoyment of human companionship. She’s not clingy but does seek it out. Sniffing leads Molly to her foster mom. Upon finding her, Molly awaits an invitation and then hops on the couch to settle for her daily dose of petting. Though SARDS has left her totally blind, she seems to make eye contact at times, and, those are moving moments. Like so many seniors, Molly’s been amazingly adaptable in foster care and is almost ready for one more family to love. If she’s a possible match for you, continue to follow her story a bit longer …


Original:  “At other times she seeks out her new human to invite petting … so sweet!“

MAESSR’s newest Molly is the 3rd blind Springer her family has fostered.  Molly’s SARDS diagnosis was confirmed years back, so it’s nothing new to her.  Because she had lived with her Maryland owner since puppyhood, Molly’s vision changes happened in a safe, familiar setting.  There she adapted well, just as she is doing now in a foster home.  This spry senior was surrendered to MAESSR only when her owner’s own health limited continuing Molly’s care.  Molly’s a joy to watch settle in and lets her fluttering tail speak for her.

With a week since arrival, Molly’s confident with a new floor plan, new humans and a new dog to share space with.  She’s not fearful in any way; there’s not a hint of aggressive reaction as she encounters the unfamiliar.

A quick learner, Molly already knows what “outside” means.  With little guidance, she crosses the kitchen and easily navigates five steps to the dog door.  With understood purpose, she goes out to do her business in the designated area.  “Molly, come” brings her back.  Accident-free, she enjoys run of the house.  Her nose leads her to the community water bowl.  She has a comfy crate in the kitchen for nighttime use.  She finds breakfast and dinner served there too so, it’s an appealing space that’s hers alone.

Clear and fair dog-dog signals on Molly’s part have quickly accomplished mutual respect and peaceful co-existence with another foster.  Molly’s message: “I’m not a plaything but I’ll share my toys.”  The other foster likes her toys … 😊.  She can be content for a couple hours of strolling the gated porch where she finds warm sunshine and interesting smells on the breezes.  When evening comes, she’ll hop onto the couch, settle for quiet time and let her foster mom stroke her plush coat.  At other times she seeks out her new human to invite petting … so sweet!

While Molly’s barely “into the honeymoon,” her new beginning is encouraging.  She reminds her foster family of earlier experiences with blind dogs.  With adept senses of smell and hearing, they can maintain a good quality of life.  A blind dog’s ability to love people isn’t necessarily compromised.  Vision-impaired dogs may require a little extra care, but often ask only that their families not rearrange the furniture. 

Molly will continue required time in foster care.  As she and her foster family get better acquainted, updates will come.  If your heart and mind may be open to what Molly can offer, please check back.  She’s a pleasure to share one’s home with.  PS …even her soft, little snore is endearing … 😊.